Archives for September 2015

House Painting Tips

One of the hallmarks of a well-kept home or prosperous business is a fresh, professional coat of paint. But most people hate painting–it takes a lot of time and skill to do the job right–plus you have to spread drop cloths over everything, climb around on ladders or scaffolding, and hope you don’t get paint in your hair. But if you like painting–you love the transformation as a dingy room or building becomes clean and new–and you’ve got the talent and experience to deliver a first-class job, then this could be the business for you. The advantages to this business are that you can work from a home base, your startup costs can be relatively low, and if you like the feeling of accomplishment that comes from a good day’s physical labor, it can be both rewarding and lucrative. You’ll need experience in painting interiors and exteriors and in working with different types of paints and primers. You’ll also need some people skills in dealing with various personalities and the ability to estimate a job and come out on the winning end.

The Market

Your targets will be homeowners, apartment buildings and condominium complexes, businesses large and small, interior designers, and real estate agents who may need help with a vacant property. You may want to specialize in certain types of painting–homeowners and interior designers will go for decorative treatments like sponge-painting, faux aging or stenciling–or, if you live in a historic area, you can specialize in ‘painted ladies,’ those glorious, gaudy Victorians, Colonial homes, or whatever suits your neighborhood. Using authentic historic colors for antique homes is very popular these days, so you can offer color consultation and expertise as part of your historical service. To sell to this type of client, send brochures to historic home associations or introduce yourself to homeowners and contractors. To target other types of prospects, send brochures; leave fliers on homeowners’ doorsteps; and network with interior designers, contractors and real estate agents. You can also place ads in local papers. If you specialize in decorative-painting techniques, get your company written up in local publications, give talks to local groups and volunteer yourself as a guest on a local radio chat show.

Needed Equipment

You can start off with a couple sizes of ladders, an assortment of brushes, rollers and paint trays and perhaps a sprayer and a breathing mask. As you grow, you can branch out to heavy-duty sprayers and compressors and a set of scaffolding. You’ll also need a pickup truck to carry you and your equipment to jobs.

VIDEO: What Kind of Paint & Trim Are for Built-Ins?

Article Source: http://www.entrepreneur.com/businessideas/house-painting

How To Cut Tiles

It’s almost inevitable that some of your tiles will have to be cut to fit your wall or floor, and there will probably be some that have to be cut into a different shape as well as size. Cutting tiles is not difficult with access to decent equipment and with a little practice. If you’re cutting your own tiles (and especially if you’re doing this for the very first time), it’s a good idea to allow a couple of extra tiles for practice or in case of any slight mishaps that may happen. Read the full article here. 

If you are planning a do-it-yourself tiling job, you’ll need to cut the tile to fit along the room’s perimeter and around corners, just to name a few situations. You can purchase a tile cutter from a home improvement store for smaller jobs using ceramic tile. But for natural stone tile, thicker tile or larger jobs, you’ll want to buy or rent a wet saw. Additionally, you can only make straight cuts with a manual tile cutter, so you’ll need tile nippers or a wet saw to cut notches and other special cuts. Read the full article here.

How to Cut Your Wall Tiles

Unless you’re tiling a small area like a splashback which you can restrict to whole tiles only, you’ll need to cut your tiles to fit. You can choose from a whole range of hand and power tools to do this – some of which are easier to use than others. What you go for will depend on the size of the job and your budget. Read the full article here.

Cutting Ceramic Tiles With a Tile Scribe

The first method for cutting straight lines in tiles is the hand cutter or tile scribe. Tipped with tungsten carbide, this tool will score the glaze on any tile. Mark the tile where you want the cut, lay another tile across the one to be cut as a straight edge, then, pressing down firmly on the cutter, draw it across the tile paying particular attention to the start and finish of your line. Read the full article here.

How to Cut Porcelain Tile Using A Tile Cutter

Practice, practice and more practice! Buy a few extra tile to practice cutting. If the tile you bought is expensive, than buy a few tiles that are on sale and practice with those. Read the full article here. 

VIDEO: Small Tile Cutting Tools